A Life of Picasso Volume II: 1907 1917: The Painter

Description

Description

John Richardson draws on the same combination of lively writing, critical astuteness, exhaustive research, and personal experience which made a bestseller out of the first volume and vividly recreates the artist’s life and work during the crucial decade of 1907-17 – a period during which Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque invented Cubism and to that extent engendered modernism.

Richardson has had unique access to untapped sources and unpublished material. By harnessing biography to art history, he has managed to crack the code of cubism more successfully than any of his predecessors. And by bringing a fresh light to bear on the artist’s often too sensationalised private life, he has succeeded in coming up with a totally new view of this paradoxical man of his paradoxical work. Never before has Picasso’s prodigious technique, his incisive vision and not least his sardonic humour been analysed with such clarity.

This second volume in Richardson’s exhaustive and intense biography of the twentieth century’s greatest artist covers the ten years from 1907, where volume one ended its epic story of youthful Bohemian struggle. Picasso was then 26; the decade covered here displays a journey to adulthood through astonishing artistic innovation, a growing renown, and the artist’s turbulent sexual relations. Richardson details Picasso’s public career, including the impact of Cubism, and his complex personal life, notably the artist’s passionate and callous treatment of his wives and mistresses (“deification followed by a degrading process of psychosexual dissection”). Through perceptive analysis of Picasso’s paintings, Richardson also offers a deep understanding of the inner demons that shaped his remarkable outer life.

John Richardson draws on the same combination of lively writing, critical astuteness, exhaustive research, and personal experience which made a bestseller out of the first volume and vividly recreates the artist’s life and work during the crucial decade of 1907-17 – a period during which Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque invented Cubism and to that extent engendered modernism.

Richardson has had unique access to untapped sources and unpublished material. By harnessing biography to art history, he has managed to crack the code of cubism more successfully than any of his predecessors. And by bringing a fresh light to bear on the artist’s often too sensationalised private life, he has succeeded in coming up with a totally new view of this paradoxical man of his paradoxical work. Never before has Picasso’s prodigious technique, his incisive vision and not least his sardonic humour been analysed with such clarity.